Project Description

OSI Maps – OSI Discovery Series Sheets 49, 55, 61 and 68 from East West Mapping www.eastwestmapping.ie

The judges of the Irish Times Best Day Out in Ireland competition 2015 selected the Barrow Way as one of the top five finest and impressive visitor attractions in the country.

The Barrow Way follows the towpath, originally a patch alongside the River Barrow where horses pulled barges and goods for transport. Nowadays, visitors can enjoy excellent flat walking, passing good land where tillage and cattle farming is predominant. The path offers much of architectural interest to the visitor. The full length of the Barrow Way from Robertstown to St. Mullins is 113km.

Heading south towards Milford, you can enjoy breathtaking scenery along the Barrow Way. Can you spot the resident herons and kingfishers? As you approach Milford Bridge, you will see Milford Mills, a seven-floor 18th-century watermill which sits on the banks of the River Barrow. Originally built as a flour mill and malting house, it was later used as a hydroelectric power station. Today the mill – although decommissioned in the 1990s – still feeds electricity back into the national grid.

Heading North towards Graiguecullen, you will see Graiguecullen Bridge which was built across a small island in the river. In the 19th century, a dwelling was constructed on the bridge – occupied for a time by the Poor Clares, a religious order.

Heading South towards Leighlinbridge, you will enjoy a beautiful riverside walk, bursting with flora and fauna. Shortly along this path, you will reach the village of Leighlinbridge, the 2001 gold medal winner of the Entente Florale, a European horticulture competition that promotes pleasant environments around Europe.


Heading North towards Milford, you will experience a beautiful riverside walk boasting a wide range of wildlife. Milford is a pleasant stop on the River Barrow with a seven-floor 18th-century watermill standing proudly beside the magnificent Milford Bridge.

Heading South towards Bagenalstown, you can enjoy one of Carlow’s most colourful historical stories. Bagenalstown, derives its name from
Walter Bagenal, who, in founding the town, had visions of mirroring the city of Versailles, in northern France. As you approach the town,
why not take a dip in the hydro heated Outdoor Swimming Pool situated beside the towpath?
(open June, July & August)

Carlow Outdoors Barrow WayHeading North towards Leighlinbridge, you are guaranteed to enjoy a beautiful riverside walk. As you approach Leighlinbridge village – 2001 gold medal winner of the Entente Florale – a European horticulture competition that promotes pleasant environments around Europe, you will see the ruins of the Black Castle beside a magnificent and functioning valerian-bearded bridge (1320).

Heading South towards Fenniscourt, you can enjoy a quiet and tranquil riverside walk, bursting with flora and fauna. The significance of Fenniscourt on the towpath can be attributed to Fenniscourt lock where there are excellent pole and waggler fishing opportunities.

Carlow Outdoors Barrow WayHeading North towards Bagenalstown, you can enjoy the sights and sounds of undisturbed wildlife. Bagenalstown, a bustling town, is situated on a picturesque stretch of the River Barrow and derives its name from Walter Bagenal, who, in founding the town, had visions of mirroring the city of Versailles, in northern France.
Heading South towards Ballytiglea Bridge, you are guaranteed to enjoy the scenery. Ballytiglea Bridge is an 18th century five arch road bridge. It is also a popular spot for fishing.

 Barrow WayHeading North towards Fennicourt, you can enjoy a peaceful riverside walk likely to be dotted with people fishing for perch, hybrids and bream.

Heading South towards Clashganny, you can breathe in the fresh air and scents of nature as you stroll along the River Barrow towpath. As
you approach Clashganny you will walk parallel with the boundary wall to Borris House Estate. Constructed in the Tudor style, Borris House
was built in 1731 by Morgan Kavanagh. It is the hereditary home of the McMorrough Kavanagh family, former Celtic Kings of Leinster. Renowned for its natural beauty, Clashganny will not disappoint.

Barrow Way
Heading North towards Ballytiglea Bridge, you can enjoy a peaceful walk along its lush towpathwhich radiates colour and beauty with each
season. On your right is Borris House (1731), the hereditary home of the former Celtic Kings of Leinster. It is also another popular fishing spot.

Heading South towards Graiguenamanagh and St. Mullins, you can breathe in the fresh air as you share the experience with people walking, cycling and canoeing. Stop off in Graiguenamanagh tovisit Duiske Abbey (1204) or stay on the towpath and visit St. Mullins, named after St. Moling (614 – 696 A. D), and enjoy its impressive ecclesiastical and archaeological history.

Heading North towards Graiguenamanagh and Clashganny, you can enjoy a most spectacular riverside walk. A green grass surface will guide you along the towpath to Graiguenamanagh and further on to Clashganny. Located five kilometres from the historical village of Borris, Clashganny is a popular spot for walking, cycling, canoeing and fishing.

‘Leave no Trace’ Principles

Practising a ‘Leave no Trace’ ethic is very simple. Make it hard for others to  see or hear you and leave no trace of your visit.

  • Plan ahead and prepare

  • Be considerate of others

  • Respect farm animals and wildlife

  • Travel and camp on durable ground

  • Leave what you find

  • Dispose of waste properly

  • Minimise the effects of fire

CONTACT DETAILS

ADDRESS

Waterways Ireland,  Floor 2 Block C, Ashtowngate, Dublin 15

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